Branding | Marketing | Strategy

Linkedin Profinder Increases Promotional Efforts

Linkedin Profinder has increased promotional efforts by requesting that users self-promote their businesses—that is, through their social network based freelance listings.

 

Linkedin Profinder increases promotional efforts

Linkedin Profinder has increased promotional efforts by requesting that users self-promote their businesses—that is, through their social network based freelance listings. Linkedin has shared code for adding a badge to your website that can be linked directly to your Profinder page so that clients can submit a proposal for you—and you can lose a lot of money for it.

How? Because Linkedin Profinder, which launched in October of 2015, requires a Premium membership in order to submit proposals after your first ten, regardless of whether or not they result in completed work.

If you're a service provider, your first 10 proposal responses through ProFinder are free to submit so you can get a sense for how the platform and the process works. After 10 proposals, a LinkedIn Premium Business Plus subscription is necessary for unlimited responses to project requests.

The Premium Business Plus membership (47.99/monthly when signed up for an annual membership) is promoted as a self-improving branding tool for your personal business appearance on Linkedin with rating analytics. It sounds like more features that were once free and are now removed from basic Linkedin membership, and other features that may help you to better utilize free services and customizations that the site provides.

Because Linkedin Profinder is only a platform for connecting freelancers with potential clients without restricting the relationship to continue via their website for work submissions and payment, the site does not take any commission or compensation from the users. That is, not considering the hefty membership fee prerequisite. Furthermore, they do not offer the security of payment (or, adversely, completion of work) that sites like Upwork offer.

Personally, I have not had any real work generate from Linkedin Profinder, and other contractors are in agreeance about its comparison to Upwork. Most of the suggested local jobs have been requests to write e-novellas or professionals interested in publishing on Linkedin’s Pulse but that do not have the time or motivation to do so.

Unlike other platforms for freelance work that can become oversaturated with low-paying or nonprofessional jobs, Linkedin does a great job of linking real profiles with client requests. However, their announcement based client matching and preference for local based meetups are doing little to attract real projects to quality freelancers. As for now, I did not need 10 proposal requests to realize that Profinder was not a viable marketplace.